4 Signs of Graft Rejection

The Hargrave Eye Center’s latest post:

corneal_transplant Hargrave Eye Center BlogA cornea transplant is most often used to restore vision to a person who has a damaged cornea. A cornea transplant may also relieve pain or other signs and symptoms associated with diseases of the cornea.

In corneal transplant surgery the scarred or damaged cornea is removed and replaced by a human donor cornea called a graft. Corneal transplant surgery also is called penetrating keratoplasty or corneal grafting. Your eye is the recipient eye because it receives the graft. The other person’s cornea is the donor cornea or donor tissue because the cornea is being donated or given to you.

There always is a possibility that the body will reject the graft. This is like an “allergic” reaction of the body against the donor cornea. It can occur any time after the surgery. There is a good chance this can be treated successfully if you act immediately. There are four danger signs you must know, according to the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor.  If any of these occur and last for more than 12 hours, you should call your ophthalmologist – even if it is a weekend or a holiday.

To remember the signs of graft rejection, remember the letters: R S V P:

Redness – For a few weeks after surgery, your eye may be red. If at any time your eye begins to get redder, you should call your ophthalmologist. You easily can check the redness of your eye by looking into a mirror and pulling down the lower lid. Look carefully at the white part of the eye, especially in the area next to the cornea.

Sensitivity to light – Bright lights may seem irritating to your eye after surgery. This, too, slowly should get better. If you notice your eye becoming so sensitive to light that you feel like covering it, you should call your ophthalmologist.

Vision changes – Your vision most likely will improve gradually after your surgery. Make a habit of checking your vision every day. Check it at about the same time and in the same light. Pick an object in your house that has some pattern or detail to it. Look at the object with your operated eye while covering the other eye with your hand. If your vision seems to be getting worse, you should call your ophthalmologist.

Pain – It is normal to have occasional small twinges of pain in your eye. If your eye develops constant pain or dull aching that lasts several hours, call your ophthalmologist.

Make a habit of checking your eye every day. Check your vision at about the same time and in the same lighting each day, perhaps at the same time you do another routine activity, such as brushing your teeth.

Source: Mayo Clinic WebsiteUniversity of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center 

from Hargrave Eye Center | Corneal Transplantation http://ift.tt/1YXoFGs

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