Are Eye Transplants on the Horizon?

The Hargrave Eye Center’s latest post:

The human body is incredibly resilient, and even after parts of it have been destroyed, it can accept foreign tissue via transplants–in certain circumstances–and continue to function as if nothing ever happened. Doctors today can transplant organs such as hearts, lungs, kidneys, and others from one person to another; there’s even a doctor who wants to perform a head transplant by next year. One organ that still cannot be transplanted is the eye, but thanks to a team of doctors and researchers in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, that may not be the case for very long.

Dr. Kia Washington, a plastic surgeon at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, is leading a research team with the goal of performing the first successful human eye transplant. She hopes that the procedure will be ready within the next 10 years.

In the United States, over one million people have vision impairments as a result of injuries. In fact, traumatic eye injuries are the fourth most common cause of combat injuries for American soldiers, which is why the Department of Defense is sponsoring Washington’s research: If she discovers a procedure for eye transplants, then it will go a long way toward treating soldiers, as well as the thousands of civilians who have impaired vision or no vision at all due to injuries.

Of course, this is all much easier said than done. A successful eye transplant would require, for one, a way of keeping the optic nerve alive during the procedure and reattaching it to the new host’s brain. Normally, upon removal, the cells in the optic nerve die immediately, thus rendering the eye useless; even if they didn’t, the new optic nerve would need to grow from the eye all the way back to the brain, which is no small feat.

However, one of Washington’s colleagues recently published a paper indicating that a cocktail of drugs, including the multiple sclerosis drug 4-AP, could help blind mice regrow their optic nerves and regain their sight after injury. This procedure, if replicable in humans, could lead to successful eye transplants. Although it is a “moonshot,” transplanting eyes in the next 10 years would be an incredible achievement that would help to treat cases of injury-related vision loss.

from Hargrave Eye Center | Corneal Transplantation http://ift.tt/2hQvG7U

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s